The Bottom Line

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The Paul Albrechtsen Foundation Inc. is generously matching donations made this month up to $25,000.

Raising awareness and funds in support of colorectal cancer.

March is colorectal cancer awareness month, which makes it a great time to talk about the disease and raise awareness and funds in support of treatment and advancements.

Colorectal cancer is one the most commonly diagnosed cancers in Manitoba. Over 900 men and women will be diagnosed annually, and more than 300 people will die from the disease. Early detection and research are key to Manitobans surviving a colorectal diagnosis.

Please watch this video to learn more about CancerCare Manitoba’s leading-edge colorectal cancer research.

Some of the world’s best and brightest cancer researchers are working right here in Manitoba.

They are making discoveries that are helping save lives. The funding provided by the Foundation to support this critical research is only possible because of donor generosity.

Important discoveries are being made at CancerCare Manitoba’s Research Institute which will lead to new advances in the treatment of colorectal cancer.

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When colon cancer is found in the earliest stage, there is over a 90 per cent chance of survival.

Chris Milton was diagnosed with colorectal cancer in 2013, and underwent surgery for it in 2014. Instead of treating his experience like something that should be kept secret and hidden away from people, he openly talks about what he went through to anyone who is curious. He shares insights into his own battle, or talks with others who’ve been diagnosed with cancer and learns from them.

“I rarely have trouble talking about the thing that’s obvious in the room that nobody else wants to talk about,” he says. “If anyone seems to be uncomfortable about asking me about cancer, I’ll bring it up. The conversation is really important.”

Through these conversations a common thread emerged for Chris. “I’ve talked to many people diagnosed with cancer, and they are extraordinarily fearful. The overwhelming thing that I think everybody deals with is fear,” he said. But by speaking with people who wanted to know more, he could break down those barriers of fear, and make the disease less scary.

“If everyone seems uncomfortable about asking me about cancer, I’ll bring it up.”

This is what The Bottom Line is all about – having conversations with friends, neighbours, coworkers, and of course, family. The more we raise awareness about colorectal cancer, the better we can fight it as a community.

“My big regret is I cancelled an important medical appointment that took me out of the loop for a follow up. Had I gone for the procedure, it might have resulted in a different outcome in my life today. I chickened out of it,” Chris says.

Early detection and research are key to Manitobans surviving a colorectal cancer diagnosis. When colon cancer is found in the earliest stage, there is over a 90 per cent chance of survival. Chris’ cancer has had a bit of metastasis, but he says he’s doing great now.

“I’m grateful for an enormous number of things in my life today, but the thing I’m probably most grateful for is the fact I have a great understanding of quality versus anything else. And to be honest, my CancerCare Manitoba experience continues to reinforce that.”

Let’s follow Chris’ example and keep the conversation going. Please show support for Manitobans facing a colorectal cancer diagnosis by donating today.

Click here to donate, and watch your gift have twice the impact, as The Paul Albrechtsen Foundation Inc. is generously matching donations up to $25,000 for The Bottom Line.

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